Home
About Us
NEXT AUCTION
UPCOMING AUCTIONS
SPECIAL AUCTIONS
Easter Monday Auction April
Victoria Day Auction Third Monday in May
Canada Day Auction July 1st
Natal Day Auction First Monday in August
Labour Day Auction First Monday in Sept
Thanksgiving Second Monday in Oct
Terms & Conditions
Rates & Fees
Record High Bids
Feedback
Booking & Reservations
FAQ
Contact Us
Our Staff
News
Tips
Business Cards
Interesting Photos
Did You Know???

Nova Scotia Auctions -- Cape Breton Auctions -- Maritime Canada Auctioneers
Durham, Nova Scotia Ph:  902-485-5968; Cell 396-6072
E-Mail: 
info@pidgeonauctions.com
Available Monday to Saturday inclusive from 8 am to 10 pm
 by appointment or by chance - NOT Sundays or Christmas Day
NOTE: If you would prefer to sell outright (rather than by auction) we purchase complete estates' small lots, collections or individual items--inc paintings, military, old money, gold/silver, jewelry, musical instruments, guns, swords, old toys, tools, old/new furniture, dishes, ornaments, textiles rugs/woolen blankets/etc, pre-1950 hats/clothing, books, new items, attic/basement/barn contents
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

24-HOUR AUCTION INFORMATION HOTLINE -- 902-485-3333

This line does not reach us directly, will not ring into office/residence( messages cannot be left at this number--designed specifically to keep you informed of current auction information--time/place of auction & directions how to get there--call if you are in doubt whether an auction will go on due
to weather conditions or to fine what is generally in current auction---call any hour day or night
   
 
PLEASE ADVISE YOUR E-MAIL ADDRESS IF YOU WISH TO BE ADDED TO MAILING LIST - send to: info@pidgeonauctions.com
(A FEW OF THE PEOPLE WHO ASKED TO BE ADDED TO MAILING LIST--WE ATTEMPTED TOSEND E-MAILS BUT THEY WERE RETURNED INDICATING
INCORRECT EMAIL ADDRESS; SO, IF YOU ASKED TO BE ADDED TO LIST AND YOU ARE NOT RECEIVING E-MAILS, THAT IS WHY--PLEASE ADVISE)

 WISHING YOU ALL
A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS
Auctions are over for the year but will start again mid-to-late January providing we fall within the Covid laws then

 

     

RECOLLECTIONS OF CHRISTMAS OVER 70 YEARS AGO
 

I still remember the mouth-watering smell of plum pudding permeating our entire house every Christmas Eve while it cooked on the old wood stove. With all my brothers at home, we numbered 8 altogether, so, Mother made the plum pudding so big, it half filled a pillow slip and boiled on the stove from noontime till nearly midnight.
And a big 25-pound turkey roasted in the oven from early evening well into the night.
Christmastime really started the first of December in those times. Everyone in town had one of the old Rexall calendars where the days were counted off.
Decorations went up the middle of December and anyone who had more than the 15-light string for their tree was considered rich. And anything lit-up for the window was a real bonus. No decorations outside then.
Pictou was isolated in those days, only the "better-offs" could afford a car and the closest town was New Glasgow (24 miles away then before the time of the causeway). Getting there and back by train or bus entailed a full day's trip. So, anything we got came from town stores and Eatons and Simpsons catalogues.
I think there was only one style of angel tree tops in the local store, for every home in Pictou had the same one (made of the old yellowish celluloid). Donnie saved the one from his home and I saved the one from mine and we decorate the fireplace mantel with both every Christmas now.
The old Thompson and Sutherland store near the top of Main Street had a big mechanical Santa in the window and so did the Henderson Shoe Store halfway down the street. Little kids wondered how Santa got from one place to the other so fast. A big hardware store (down past where the court house is now located) had a large electric train set and all the accompanying paraphernalia filling the whole window. I remember us kids pressing our faces against the glass, absolutely mesmerized.
The Salvation Army did a lot to help poor families in town then and everyone respected the red pot and put in whatever they could manage. They were always located in front of the old post office--the big old stone building on Main Street. It was so nice then--the Army had their whole band out playing Christmas carols Friday evenings and Saturday afternoons in December.
Christmastime was the biggest event of the year for us all. Money was tight and gifts were scanty, but we were all so grateful and happy for what we had. I don't recall much of the gifts I got, but, I do recall the stockings stuffed with some hard candy, an orange and an apple and a small toy. (Imagine kids getting an orange in a stocking today!)
Father's Christmas gift was always a bag of "Creams". He just loved those candies and only got them that one time a year. I haven't even heard of them for ages.
Donnie has never forgotten the fire truck he got for Christmas one year when he was a kid. He kept that for years.
Christmas dinner was perhaps the most memorable time for me. It was the one time of the year my whole family was together (I was the baby, so my brothers were older and some were working away, but they always came home for Christmas). We all crammed around the old oak table in our tiny kitchen together and stuffed ourselves. Later, we sat around reminiscing, singing and playing musical instruments for the afternoon.
At Donnie's place, it was different, for he was an only child, so when he was old enough, after Christmas dinner, he was off to the woods rabbit hunting with the 22 shells he got for Christmas….and anyone who really knows him knows he's never changed through the years--he still dearly loves being in the woods and hunting.
Christmastime was very simplified back then, but it was a time of love and sharing and caring for each other and money wasn't the issue.